Midnight Sun : Fishing for Baltic Salmon in Northern Sweden

Part.1

In pursuit of Baltic salmon we head north of the Arctic polar circle. Deep into northern Sweden we found ourself immersed in a culture as passionate as the fish are powerful. The scale and power of the river can only be matched by the beauty of its salmon. Our trip started on the Byske River and took an exciting turn downstream on the Torne River. Follow along on the adventure as we head deeper and deeper into the system that these salmon call home.

We met with Ted Logardt and Calle Lundqvist in Byske, an hour away from the Luleå airport. They showed us around the Byske River for the following two days. Every pool we fished appeared to be filled with salmon, but none of them seemed to be a takers. From Byske, we headed for Kengis Bruk on the Torne River, North of the polar arctic circle, still in search of our first Baltic salmon.

An overnight ride allowed us to make it to Kengis and meet with Lars Munk in time for the prime time 3:30am drop. This impressive river got us doubting our double hand casting abilities, and seeing Lars’s cast confirmed we’d have to step our game up. Marking the border between Sweden and Finland, the Torne River is one of the biggest river in Lapland. There are currently an estimated 52,000 Baltic salmon in the system and this number should at least double before the end of the season.

 

 

Time really is a vague concept in Swedish Lapland at this time of the year. The midnight sun makes it possible to fish 24h a day, which is exactly what we did on our first night on the Torne River. Hanging out by the fire, drinking one coffee after the other and hoping for the magic to happen. By 1:30 the next morning, Stu hooked into the first fish of the trip. After an afternoon nap, persistance payed off as Charles landed his first Baltic as well.